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COURSES & PROGRAMS

Nano-Link Affiliate Courses and Programs Provide:
Time Savings – Over 30 semester long courses are available for use by other institutions.
Quality Assurance – Expert help to tailor the content for your student, industry and institution requirements is included.

Courses and Programs by Nano-Link Affiliates

These courses and programs have been developed by Nano-Link Affiliates and are offered at two and four year colleges across the country. The resources (slides, tests, quizzes, and more) associated with these courses and programs can be requested from the Nano-Link Affiliate institution at no charge to you. Affiliates work with Nano-Link to develop a proven model of success for instruction, recruiting and retaining Nano-savvy technicians.
Take advantage of our Affiliates’ expertise, contact them, learn more about what they can offer or learn how you can become a Nano-Link Affiliate.

Courses at Dakota County Technical College

Location: Rosemount, MN

Dakota County Technical College, Rosemount Campus, is home to Nano-Link. The A.A.S. degree Nanoscience Technician program at DCTC was developed through a partnership with the University of Minnesota. Current offerings are subject to change, see the DCTC website for more information. The four semester program matrix DCTC-Semester-Charg.pdf (208 downloads) DCTC-Semester-Charg.pdf, is free for your use in proposing/designing your own program.
Contact Mike Opp for information about Nano-Link, mike.opp@dctc.edu

Introductory Courses

Fundamentals of Nanotechnology I

The course provides an introduction into nanoscience and includes the history of nanotechnology and also an introduction into the tools used to study the world at the nanoscale. This course also covers a sense of scale, exponential notation, surface area to volume ratio, molecular and atomic structure and the various forces that are predominant at various scale levels (macro, micro and nano). Understanding of these concepts is fundamental to learning how nanoscale interactions and phenomena differ from those in our common macroscale world. Societal impacts along with a technology maturity model are also considered as they apply to nanoscience. Finally this first course provides specific study of the application of nanotechnology to biological areas such as the study of proteins, drug interactions, cell operation and ion channels. Sensing systems and newly developed diagnostic tools that are a result of understanding the biological system at the nanoscale are also discussed.

Fundamentals of Nanotechnology II

The second semester course focuses on the material science, chemistry and physics aspects of the nanoscale. The course begins with the discussion of elemental material attributes and how environment can impact properties and performance of the starting material. Crystal structure and material properties are then discussed with an emphasis on differences in interactions and measurements at various scale realms. Using the current semiconductor fabrication process as a foundation, students are introduced to the concepts and limitations of current photolithography and etching processes. New approaches toward electronic circuits are introduced as students gain an understanding of the current process and necessary operation concepts for todays electronic devices. Finally, the concepts of fluid mechanics, optics, photonics and lasers are discussed with an emphasis on new devices and applications based on nanoscale properties.

Lab Courses

Interdisciplinary Lab

This course covers the experimental aspects of the accompanying third semester nano courses. Four major lab activities are planned for the course. Each lab addresses creation, measurement, assessment, improvement and rework. This circular understanding and assessment/improvement cycle is included in the detail lab descriptions.

Student Research Lab

This course provides introductory experience with nanoscience equipment, investigative research approaches and critical thinking methodologies. Students work on industry provided problems and examples, traditional nanoscience experiments and independent work. Focus is on the investigative process, scientific method and project planning where students apply and investigate foundational nanotechnology concepts while learning basic equipment operation, safety techniques and basic lab procedures.

Manufacturing & QA

Manufacturing Quality Assurance

This course covers multiple manufacturing methodologies (chemical solutions, electro filament, molding, coating, rolling etc. first in the traditional sense and second as these techniques apply to the nanoscale. Quality Assurance (Six Sigma) practices will be discussed with an emphasis on QA and reliability at the nanoscale. Design of experiments, measurements, approaches, data tracking, process improvement and statistical analysis and reporting will be discussed.

Biotechnology

Nanobiotechnology

This course increases the depth of topics covered in previous courses. Students investigate the potential of nanoscience in multiple biological applications including nanopore, nanoparticle and nanochannel structures, diagnostics and treatment. Emphasis is placed on interactions between biological and non-biological systems and understanding biochemistry.

Electronics

Nanoelectronics

This course increases the depth of topics covered in previous courses. Quantum physics is reintroduced at a greater depth with coverage of band structure, conduction, diffusion, thin film response and optical properties from a modern physics perspective. Students study, measure, evaluate and create fabricated structures such as nanowires, cantilevers and nano channels as well as topics in application of nanoscale principles, imprint lithography, etching, component block assembly of nanotransistors, quantum computing, magnetic and electron spin memory and holographic memory devices.

Materials

Nanomaterials

This course increases the depth of topics covered in previous courses. Focus is on single walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (fabrication, property measurement and compound formulation), creation of nanomaterials, particles and crystals by various processes including colloidal suspensions, deposition, evaporation and plating. Properties (hardness, wear resistance, adhesion, conductivity etc.) and measurement techniques of nanomaterials are covered as well as topics in interactions between organic and inorganic materials.

Career Exploration

Career Planning and Industry Tours

This course prepares students for the Nanoscience Technician Program fourth semester at the University of Minnesota and for the job market upon graduation. Class discussion and guest speakers advise students in selection of a specific career path, creation of a resume and portfolio, preparation and practice in job interviewing and options for continuing education. Industry tours provide students with a broad experience of potential jobs and activities related to nanoscience in a variety of industrial settings.

Industry Internship

Students participate in a working internship usually at one company for a minimum time of 320 hours. This internship provides a broad base of application knowledge, which will complement and enhance specific course materials. Industry Task Force members have committed to providing internships.

Technical

Computer Simulation

This course covers the application of computer simulation (modeling) to nanoscale systems. In addition, this course provides a visualization of concepts and interactions covered in previous courses. In addition, this course covers applied statistics, design of experiments and impact of input parameter variations for biological and mechanical systems.

Courses at University of Minnesota

Location: Minneapollis, MN

Currently DCTC and UMN partner to develop and offer programs in nano technology/science. Contact Jim Marti, Sr. Scientist & Outreach Coordinator – UMN Nano Center for more information, jmarti@umn.edu 612-626-0732

Courses at Chippewa Valley Technical College

Location: Eau Claire, WI

CVTC has developed 12 courses for a nano technology/science program. Current offerings are subject to change, see the CVTC website for more information. Contact Hans Mikelson, hmikelson@cvtc.edu for more information

Introductory Courses

Fundamentals of Nanoscience (Not available Fall Semester)

Nanotechnology, the capability to observe and manipulate systems at the molecular or atomic scale, is affecting many aspects of science and technology. This course provides an introduction to the history, tools, materials, and current and emerging applications of Nanotechnology. Emphasis is on the tools used to observe at the nanoscale and the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials. The application of Nanotechnology to fields such as electronics, materials, energy, and biology is studied.

Lab Courses

Lab Science Instrumentation

This course prepares students in the theory and operation of common analytical instruments used in high technology laboratories. Instruments introduced include spectrometers (NMR/MRI, IR, UV/VIS, IR, X-Ray, and MS), microscopes (including SEM and AFM), and chromatography systems (HPLC and gas). Students are introduced to concepts of sampling, analysis, Beer’s Law, and calibration.

Biotechnology Lab

This course covers laboratory methods of biotechnology. Methods of biological separations are covered including centrifugation, protein recrystallization, electrophoresis, and chromatography. DNA manipulation is covered including restriction enzyme cleavage, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), plasmid, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) methods. Analytical methods are covered including HPLC and ELISA. Methods of bioinformatics is also included.

Micro and Nano Fabrication

This course provides an overview of micro and nanofabrication methods. Industry trends in microfabrication and cleanroom processing will be explored. Fabrication methods covered include photolithography, wet and dry etching, and physical and chemical vapor deposition of thin films. Vacuum systems, plasma processing, and metrology are covered as they relate to microfabrication.

Micro and Nano Fab Lab

This course teaches the applications of thin film deposition (sputtering, CVD, PECVD), photolithography, oxidation, wet and dry etching, diffusion and ion implantation techniques for doping, wafer terminology, testing, evaluation, and yield factors in the semiconductor industry.

Manufacturing & QA

Manufacturing and Quality Assurance

In this course you explore concepts of quality assurance as applied to manufacturing environments. Concepts fundamental to quality assurance include: planning, documentation and record keeping, process improvement concepts, design of experiments, and statistical process control graphic communications used in quality, safety, and reliability. Includes graphing of quality attributes, create process control charts, create a design of experiments and examine measurement and engineering documentation.

Lean Fundamentals

This course provides an introductory study of the Lean Manufacturing philosophy to reduce or eliminate waste in a manufacturing setting. The fundamental 5-step process sequence of Lean: 1) Specify value from the customer perspective, 2) Identify the value stream steps for product families and eliminate waste, 3) Improve product flow to increase value creating steps, 4) Improve value connections with upstream customers, and 5) Stabilize processes and continue improvement for waste reduction. Lean terminology and tools used such as 5S are examined along with the benefits and pitfalls encountered in implementation is covered.

Manufacturing Processes and Lab Science

This course provides students with an overview of manufacturing processes used in a variety of industries from electronics to pharmaceuticals. This may include wet chemical, food, refinery, semiconductor, biomedical device, polymers and pharmaceutical processing methods used in manufacturing. This may also include computer controlled machining, rapid prototyping and applications of computer aided design.

Biotechnology

Intro to Nanobiotechnology

This class examines cellular function and biochemical processes at the nanoscale. Topics include chemical components of cells, energy, catalysis, biosynthesis, protein structure and function, DNA and chromosomes, genomics, gene expression and gene evolution. The course explores nanoscale cellular processes at the molecular level and how an understanding of these processes informs and enables advanced applications in medicine and emerging biotechnology industries.

Biotechnology Lab

This course covers laboratory methods of biotechnology. Methods of biological separations are covered including centrifugation, protein recrystallization, electrophoresis, and chromatography. DNA manipulation is covered including restriction enzyme cleavage, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), plasmid, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) methods. Analytical methods are covered including HPLC and ELISA. Methods of bioinformatics is also included.

Electronics

Nano Lab Electronics

This course gives the student a basic understanding of electronics as they are used in the laboratory and clean room. Emphasis on basic principles of electronics and how those may be applied to understanding the operation and troubleshooting of electronic instruments in the laboratory. Topics covered include charge, voltage, resistance, Ohm’s law, power law, capacitance, series and parallel circuits, inductors, magnetism, motors, transformers, alternating current circuits, relays, diodes, transistors, amplifiers, digital circuits, logic gates, integrated circuits, computer chips, microcontrollers, programmable logic controllers. Practical skills include bread-boarding, simulating circuits, circuit layout, printed circuit board fabrication, soldering, trouble shooting, using digital multimeters, oscilloscopes, and curve tracers.

Intro to Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are microscopic moving devices manufactured using computer chip fabrication methods. They have a wide variety of applications including in air bag collision sensors, digital projectors, optical communications, and chemical sensors. Students  continue their experience in microfabrication and microelectronics manufacturing to design and manufacture MEMS in the cleanroom.

Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design

This course allows students to use principles of computer aided design to design micro electro mechanical systems and microfluidic devices.  Students make use of Sandia National Laboratories SUMMIT V MEMS design software. Material considerations for micro-fabricated devices are included.

Courses at Oakton Community College

Location: Skokie, IL

Oakton has developed 4 courses for nano technology/science programs. Current offerings are subject to change, see the Oakton website for more information. Contact John Carzoli, jcarzoli@oakton.edu 847-376-7042 or John Ireland for more information,  jireland@oakton.edu 847-635-1684

Introductory Courses

Fundamentals of Nanotechnology I

Course introduces the nanoworld, coverning topics in nanophysics, nanochemistry and nanobiology, including forces, fluidics, wave nature of light, atoms and molecules, nanoscale structures, biological function at the nanoscale and practical applications in each field. Hands-on laboratory activities make use of dip-pen nanolithography, atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and nanoparticle characterization.

Fundamentals of Nanotechnology II

Course continues discussion of topics covered in Phy 140 at greater depth, including topics in nanophysics, nanomechanics, nanoelectronics, and nanobiology, including forces, fluidics, wave nature of light, photonics, atomic and molecular bonds, nanoscale structures, unit cells, crystals, quantum mechanics, electronic band structure, conductivity, and thermal properties of materials. Hands-on laboratory activities make use of dip-pen nanolithography, atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, nanoparticle characterization, scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, nanoparticle synthesis and carbon nanotube synthesis.

Career Exploration

Nanotechnology Internship

Course consists of direct work experience in a nanotechnology related environment at an approved business or industrial firm applying knowledge and skills learned to their daily assigned responsibilities. The student will meet with a nanotechnology instructor who will evaluate their on-the-job technical skills. Arrangements for the work experience will be worked out in conjunction with the nanotechnology coordinator. In addition, the student will discuss work-related situations with the instructor.

Technical

Nanotechnology Projects

This course uses project-based learning and team-building techniques to study topics in electronics, photonics, thin films, biotechnology, and procedures for troubleshooting instrumentation. Instrumentation and techniques include, atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, nanoparticle characterization, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy, basic photonics, photolithography, profilometry, and ellipsometry.

Courses at Northcentral Technical College

Location: Wausau, WI

Northcentral has developed 2 courses for nano technology/science programs. Current offerings are subject to change, see the NCTC website for more information. Contact Frank Fernandes for more information, fernande@ntc.edu 715-803-1399

Introductory Courses

Science of Nanotechnology I

This course provides an introduction to Nanoscience and includes the history of Nanotechnology and also an introduction to the tools used to study the world at the nanoscale. This course also covers a sense of scale, exponential notation, surface area to volume and the various forces that are predominant at various scale levels (macro, micro and nano).

Science of Nanotechnology 2

This course focuses on the material science, chemistry and physics aspects of the nanoscale. The course begins with a discussion of elemental attributes and how the environment can impact properties and performance of the starting material. Crystal structure and material properties are then discussed with an emphasis on differences in interactions and measurement at the various scale realms.

Courses at Valley City State University

Location: Valley City, ND

Valley City has developed courses for nano technology/science programs. Contact Gary Ketterling for more information

Courses offered online by METPHAST

With funding from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program, the Midwest Emerging Technologies Public Health and Safety Training (METPHAST) Program develops and disseminates web-based modules to educate and train a variety of learners about health and safety issues associated with emerging technologies. This is a multi-institutional collaboration among the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and Dakota County Technical College.

METPHAST is developing 20 modules related to nanotechnology health and safety. The first five modules will introduce learners with no prior background in occupational health and safety to the most important aspects of occupational hygiene. The remaining 15 modules will focus on the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of hazards presented by working with nanomaterials.

High School Programs

Currently there are two high school programs being mentored by Nano-Link. Instructors at these schools also serve as Affiliates to Nano-Link contributing to module development and participate in the annual Nano-Link Student Conference.

Mundelein High School Location: Mundelein, IL

Wheeling High School Location: Skokie, IL